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a calm dissonance
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Here the skeptic finds chaos and the believer further evidence that the hand that made us is divine
- Robert Moses

deanandthedemonbloodprince:

I was wearing my Gryffindor shirt while Christmas shopping and there was this cute boy in a Slytherin hat and we made eye contact and he looked me up and down and said “10 points to Gryffindor” and winked at me and normally I hate being hit on but damn son that’s the way to do it

(via theviolentflame)

Filed under: hp, maaaan,
Source: femburton

pepper-soup:

and that is why feminism needs to focus less on media representation and more on social/economic policies that damages women and children because you end up feminists who are more outraged about a woman whose cellulite is being mocked but not outraged about that same woman supporting a destructive regime that is literally kills women and children 

(via papayabasketcase)

Filed under: babe,
Source: browngurl

Dat LoK finale doe

malfoypure:

A muggleborn and pureblood couple having their first child and the pureblood not knowing about ultrasounds so they don’t understand why their partner is dragging them to a muggle doctor until they get there and suddenly they see a physical picture of their newborn child and hear it’s little heartbeat and it’s better than any magic they’ve ever seen.

(via mesreves)

Filed under: q,
blackandkillingit:

allopaola:

Stay tuned… #fanmdjanm @watcherica @fanmdjanm

Black Girls Killing It Shop BGKI NOW

blackandkillingit:

allopaola:

Stay tuned… #fanmdjanm @watcherica @fanmdjanm

Black Girls Killing It Shop BGKI NOW

(via thefemme-menace)

moonofficial:

stop making movies about straight people

(via thefemme-menace)

Filed under: q,
The bicycle is a curious vehicle. Its passenger is its engine.
— John Howard
Filed under: q,
Source: inhabitude
I take great care of myself by carefully shutting myself away
— Vincent Van Gogh in a letter to his brother, Theo. [letter] (via leepace)

(via thefemme-menace)

Filed under: q,
Source: hellray
Other people are not medicine.
— Amy Poehler (via slutsandsinners)

(via herscience)

dion-thesocialist:

"Introverts gain energy from being alone. Extroverts gain energy from social interactions."

Incorrect! Both introverts and extroverts gain energy from food, like all living beings.

On the day Kim Kardashian
releases her book of selfies,
my sister will weigh herself in the bathroom
for the third time that morning.
She’ll lean over and flush the toilet
when we begin to wonder.
No one will hear her easing off the machine,
slowly like pre-landmine.
No will notice her turn the cold tap all the way
and watch her fingers grow pale and red and pale
because she can’t meet her own eyes in the mirror.

Seven years of self-teaching
and I am still afraid of smiling with teeth.
A kid in my sixth grade class called me
a beaver during Math and I watched
my best friend’s pigtails swing in the seat in front of me
as she giggled. She has a laugh like wind chimes,
I remember thinking. She has a laugh that affords
showing teeth, I remember thinking.

Later, I snuck the family camera into my bedroom
and took pictures of myself smiling.
I set the counter each time, sat back on my bed,
waited for the clicks to sound.
Fifty three pictures of myself grinning.
Fifty of them blurry, with my bare teeth dead centre,
like a cave aglow with light,
bare teeth like the wolves would run for cover,
teeth like that girl must know how to
take her place in this world.

On the day Kim Kardashian
releases her book of selfies,
I’ll get a message from an anonymous sender.
It’ll say, “Stop posting pictures of yourself.
Stick to poetry.”
You’ll tell me it is not a problem.
You’ll ask me how my day was.
I’ll talk to your forehead because
your glassy eyes are good reflectors.

My chin is made of material
I’ve mined with my bare hands
from the many nights I dug through to get here.
My jawline is a mountain only I can climb.
My acne doesn’t care what you think.
There is still dirt under my nails and I love it.
There are bags under my eyes and I love it.
A camera click is my way of saying
I am tired, but I got here. I am sculpted
roughly and my edges are worn and
my fingers always find their way to my neck
but I got here. I got here and I will damn well tape
the evidence on my wall if I so please.

So take this picture of me.
Tell them I am vain. Tell them you think
my little sister must be learning all the wrong things
from me. And I will tell you that I don’t know
if she can define love without mentioning someone else
and that when I take a picture of her,
she will look at it afterwards in silence,
grateful she didn’t have to take it herself.

Tell them, also, that I am alive.
Tell them, also, that this girl
made it. Tell them I look at my lips now
like the kisses they were born to be.
Tell them I see the camera shutter
in my eyes before the click.
Tell them that these days, I can’t help but
smile with teeth.

Selfish | Ramna Safeer

(via negactivity)

Source: inkywings
medievalpoc:

jonomancer:

Brahmagupta, Indian mathematician (598 - 670), known as the “inventor of zero”. Picture from findinsideindia.com.
Brahmagupta was head of the astronomical observatory at Ujjain, a holy city in the Malwa region of central India. (Ujjain has been a center of learning since ancient times, and is known in Hindu tradition as the place where Krishna went to receive his education. The observatory of Ujjain was considered the prime meridian, as Greenwich England is today, making it the baseline for all astronomical observations.)From his observations he deduced that the moon is closer to the earth than the sun is, and that the earth and heavenly bodies are all spheres. His calculation of the length of the solar year is accurate to within about half an hour! But Brahmagupta is best known for his mathematical writings, and especially for developing the concept of zero as a number.In his great work Brahmasphutasiddhanta (“The Opening of the Universe”), Brahmagupta wrote:    When zero is added to a number or subtracted from a number, the number remains unchanged; and a number multiplied by zero becomes zero. Previous schoars had used various symbols as placeholders to show the lack of a number or digit. Brahmagupta was the first to treat zero as a number in its own right, something that could be used in calculations along with other numbers. In doing so, he extended the rules of arithmetic from the natural numbers to what we now call the integers, including zero and negative numbers. Here’s more rules from the Brahmasphutasiddhanta:    A debt minus zero is a debt.    A fortune minus zero is a fortune.    Zero minus zero is a zero.    A debt subtracted from zero is a fortune.    A fortune subtracted from zero is a debt.    The product of zero multiplied by a debt or fortune is zero.    The product of zero multipliedby zero is zero.    The product or quotient of two fortunes is one fortune.    The product or quotient of two debts is one fortune.    The product or quotient of a debt and a fortune is a debt.    The product or quotient of a fortune and a debt is a debt.(“Fortune” and “Debt” were Brahmagupta’s quite descriptive terms for what we’d now call positive and negative numbers.)This is one of those ideas that’s so simple that, from our vantage point centuries later, it’s hard to imagine anyone not understanding it, but people had been struggling along without zero for centuries. It must have taken a stroke of genius to realize that “nothing” is something!But he didn’t stop with negative numbers! The Brahmasphutasiddhanta also contains methods for:- Finding square roots, using an algorithm that Newton would rediscover centuries later!- Solving quadratic equations!- Trigonometry, including tables of sines and cosines!- Summing series of squares and cubes- Finding the area of cyclic quadrilateralsHis work holds up extremely well today. His approximation of Pi was correct to within a few hundredths. About the only place where modern mathematicians would disagree with Brahmagupta is his statement that 0 divided by 0 is 0, where today we leave division by zero undefined.Sources:http://www-groups.dcs.st-and.ac.uk/~history/Biographies/Brahmagupta.htmlhttp://www.famous-mathematicians.com/brahmagupta/https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Brahmagupta

Math and Science Week!

medievalpoc:

jonomancer:

Brahmagupta, Indian mathematician (598 - 670), known as the “inventor of zero”. Picture from findinsideindia.com.

Brahmagupta was head of the astronomical observatory at Ujjain, a holy city in the Malwa region of central India. (Ujjain has been a center of learning since ancient times, and is known in Hindu tradition as the place where Krishna went to receive his education. The observatory of Ujjain was considered the prime meridian, as Greenwich England is today, making it the baseline for all astronomical observations.)

From his observations he deduced that the moon is closer to the earth than the sun is, and that the earth and heavenly bodies are all spheres. His calculation of the length of the solar year is accurate to within about half an hour! But Brahmagupta is best known for his mathematical writings, and especially for developing the concept of zero as a number.

In his great work Brahmasphutasiddhanta (“The Opening of the Universe”), Brahmagupta wrote:

    When zero is added to a number or subtracted from a number, the number remains unchanged; and a number multiplied by zero becomes zero.

Previous schoars had used various symbols as placeholders to show the lack of a number or digit. Brahmagupta was the first to treat zero as a number in its own right, something that could be used in calculations along with other numbers. In doing so, he extended the rules of arithmetic from the natural numbers to what we now call the integers, including zero and negative numbers. Here’s more rules from the Brahmasphutasiddhanta:

    A debt minus zero is a debt.
    A fortune minus zero is a fortune.
    Zero minus zero is a zero.
    A debt subtracted from zero is a fortune.
    A fortune subtracted from zero is a debt.
    The product of zero multiplied by a debt or fortune is zero.
    The product of zero multipliedby zero is zero.
    The product or quotient of two fortunes is one fortune.
    The product or quotient of two debts is one fortune.
    The product or quotient of a debt and a fortune is a debt.
    The product or quotient of a fortune and a debt is a debt.

(“Fortune” and “Debt” were Brahmagupta’s quite descriptive terms for what we’d now call positive and negative numbers.)

This is one of those ideas that’s so simple that, from our vantage point centuries later, it’s hard to imagine anyone not understanding it, but people had been struggling along without zero for centuries. It must have taken a stroke of genius to realize that “nothing” is something!

But he didn’t stop with negative numbers! The Brahmasphutasiddhanta also contains methods for:

- Finding square roots, using an algorithm that Newton would rediscover centuries later!
- Solving quadratic equations!
- Trigonometry, including tables of sines and cosines!
- Summing series of squares and cubes
- Finding the area of cyclic quadrilaterals

His work holds up extremely well today. His approximation of Pi was correct to within a few hundredths. About the only place where modern mathematicians would disagree with Brahmagupta is his statement that 0 divided by 0 is 0, where today we leave division by zero undefined.

Sources:
http://www-groups.dcs.st-and.ac.uk/~history/Biographies/Brahmagupta.html
http://www.famous-mathematicians.com/brahmagupta/
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Brahmagupta

Math and Science Week!

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